reactor schematic

The Future of Nuclear Power?

There are discussions among members of the environmental community about nuclear power. Some have suggested that nuclear power can be part of the solution to curbing the release of greenhouse gases. Others disagree.
Dr Amory Lovins, noted physicist and sustainable energy guru, notes that “Each dollar spent on a new reactor buys about 2-10 times less carbon savings, 20-40 times slower, than spending that dollar on the cheaper, faster, safer solutions that make nuclear power unnecessary and uneconomic”. Then there is this:

In March 2011 a magnitude 8.9 earthquake and subsequent tsunami has initiated a crisis in northern Japan. Damage to several nuclear reactors has caused the leakage of three hundred tonnes of radionuclide containing water into the ground and nearby sea.

Four of the six reactors at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant were irreparably damaged.  Although the reactor cores may not have suffered any catastrophic failure of the containment vessels, partial meltdowns have occurred. Partial meltdowns occur when the fuel in the core gets so hot that the metallic cladding of the fuel rods melt. This means that the reactors will never be used again and in fact constitute a huge expense for cleanup.

Radiation due to fissile isotopes has been detected at levels some 400 times normal in the soil about 25 miles from the plant and traces of radiation have been detected in air as far away as Seattle, Washington. An ocean plume of radioactive water will reach the US in 2014.

ocean plume

Ocean Plume

The relative risk is unknown but simply calls attention to the magnitude of the damage which has occurred at the reactors in northern japan.

Much of the radiation must be coming from the on-site waste storage. The issue of nuclear waste continues to plague the nuclear industry in one form or another. We all want the power, but nobody wants the waste.

The problems at the Fukushima plant are due mainly due to the loss of power on site. The diesel generators which should have provided backup power to the site to maintain reactor coolant water failed because of the tsunami. Because of lack of coolant water, the fuel rods overheated, causing the metal cladding to melt, then react with steam in the reactor to produce Hydrogen. It was this Hydrogen which caused explosions in two or more of the reactor buildings. These explosions damaged the spent fuel pools which allowed water to leak out, thus precipitating radiation leaks.

The fuel rods in the spent fuel pools constitute high level nuclear waste. Unlike the fuel rods in the cores of the reactors, those in the spent fuel pool are not within any containment barrier. Rather they sit at the bottom of a swimming pool like structure. When coolant water is lost from these pools the rods overheat, melt and release radioactivity.

Every reactor in the United States stores its high level radioactive wastes in this relatively insecure fashion. The wastes are stored in the pools for five to ten years until cool enough to be moved to other storage locations. Severe weather events such as tornadoes, flooding, hurricanes, or even terrorists could damage the integrity of the fuel pools, unlike the much more secure reactor cores.

If nuclear power is to have a renaissance, there must be greater attention paid to the issue of on site waste storage. Of course more secure handling of wastes will only add to the cost and it is ultimately cost factors which will determine the fate of nuclear power here in the United States.

One thought on “The Future of Nuclear Power?

  1. Donald L Brigance

    It still seems selfish for ten generations to have power and leave a mess for a hundred generation to deal with. But hey, I thought Rancho Seco was a bad idea, so what do I know?

    Reply

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