wind-farm

Opposition to Transmission Line

Pope County Quorum Court opposes clean air, stable climate!

Recently the quorum court voted unanimously to oppose the construction of Plains and Clean Line’s High Voltage Direct Current transmission line. The HVDC line has been proposed to run from Guymon, Oklahoma to Memphis, Tennessee. If built it will move 3,500 MegaWatts of wind generated electricity from the Midwest to Arkansas and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) power grids.

The resolution reads in part “If this power line is built, it will be an enduring eyesore to Arkansas and Pope County, affecting the natural beauty of this area and damaging property values with little positive effect…”

This proposed transmission line is an eyesore compared to what? The welter of transmission lines emanating from Arkansas Nuclear One? Or would it be an eyesore compared to the transmission lines coming from the powerhouse at the Lake Dardanelle Dam. Maybe it is an eyesore compared to the transmission line running from the half a dozen or so other power plants in Arkansas.

Power lines, be they large transmission lines or the smaller distribution lines are a fact of life. Literally hundreds of miles of transmission and distributions lines, owned by both private (Entergy) and co-op (Arkansas Valley Electric) corporations, criss-cross the county already.

It has been suggested that we could free ourselves of these and future electric grid improvement “eyesores” by the utilization of underground cables. That is certainly an option, but a very expensive one. Installation costs for underground transmission lines can be 8 to 10 times that of overhead lines. Although buried cables are less likely to fail due to weather events for example, when they do fail repair times are greatly extended. Repairing or replacing buried cables can require days or weeks rather than hours.

Another option would be distributed electrical energy sources such as roof-top solar PV to avoid the need for large transmission lines but even here there is a need for a wide area distribution grid. Roof-top solar is also much more expensive than utility scale wind power. Many states including Arkansas, are enacting legislation to make roof top solar even more expensive.

Another point in the quorum court resolution is that the line will provide “little positive benefit.” People that appreciate clean air and a more stable climate might quibble with the little part of the resolution. The proposed line will carry the power equivalent of five or six coal fired boilers. That could mean millions of tons of coal not burned every year. Just for perspective, those interminably long coal trains that snarl traffic as they pass through Russellville carry tens of thousands of tons of coal every day from Wyoming strip mines to one power plant in Redfield Arkansas.

The real irony of the quorum court vote is the simple fact that each and everyone of the JPs gets electricity to his or her home via the grid. That means many folks “upstream” have to suffer eyesores and devaluation of their property to keep the lights and big screen TVs powered up in the JPs’ homes. A similar resolution was passed by the Johnson County Quorum Court. Hypocrisy much?

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