Tag Archives: HVDC


Opposition to Transmission Line

Pope County Quorum Court opposes clean air, stable climate!

Recently the quorum court voted unanimously to oppose the construction of Plains and Clean Line’s High Voltage Direct Current transmission line. The HVDC line has been proposed to run from Guymon, Oklahoma to Memphis, Tennessee. If built it will move 3,500 MegaWatts of wind generated electricity from the Midwest to Arkansas and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) power grids.

The resolution reads in part “If this power line is built, it will be an enduring eyesore to Arkansas and Pope County, affecting the natural beauty of this area and damaging property values with little positive effect…”

This proposed transmission line is an eyesore compared to what? The welter of transmission lines emanating from Arkansas Nuclear One? Or would it be an eyesore compared to the transmission lines coming from the powerhouse at the Lake Dardanelle Dam. Maybe it is an eyesore compared to the transmission line running from the half a dozen or so other power plants in Arkansas.

Power lines, be they large transmission lines or the smaller distribution lines are a fact of life. Literally hundreds of miles of transmission and distributions lines, owned by both private (Entergy) and co-op (Arkansas Valley Electric) corporations, criss-cross the county already.

It has been suggested that we could free ourselves of these and future electric grid improvement “eyesores” by the utilization of underground cables. That is certainly an option, but a very expensive one. Installation costs for underground transmission lines can be 8 to 10 times that of overhead lines. Although buried cables are less likely to fail due to weather events for example, when they do fail repair times are greatly extended. Repairing or replacing buried cables can require days or weeks rather than hours.

Another option would be distributed electrical energy sources such as roof-top solar PV to avoid the need for large transmission lines but even here there is a need for a wide area distribution grid. Roof-top solar is also much more expensive than utility scale wind power. Many states including Arkansas, are enacting legislation to make roof top solar even more expensive.

Another point in the quorum court resolution is that the line will provide “little positive benefit.” People that appreciate clean air and a more stable climate might quibble with the little part of the resolution. The proposed line will carry the power equivalent of five or six coal fired boilers. That could mean millions of tons of coal not burned every year. Just for perspective, those interminably long coal trains that snarl traffic as they pass through Russellville carry tens of thousands of tons of coal every day from Wyoming strip mines to one power plant in Redfield Arkansas.

The real irony of the quorum court vote is the simple fact that each and everyone of the JPs gets electricity to his or her home via the grid. That means many folks “upstream” have to suffer eyesores and devaluation of their property to keep the lights and big screen TVs powered up in the JPs’ homes. A similar resolution was passed by the Johnson County Quorum Court. Hypocrisy much?

Arkansas and the HVDC Power Line

Plains and Eastern Clean Line has proposed and are planning the construction of a 700 mile High Voltage Direct Current Power line stretching from the Oklahoma Panhandle to Memphis. The 600 kilovolt line will have the capacity to move 3.5 GigaWatts of power, equivalent to the output of 5 or 6 coal fired power plants. This represents a major move to deliver excess clean, wind-generated electricity out of the midwest to markets to the east.

wind turbine blade

wind turbine blade

Similar projects are in progress to our north, the Grain Belt Express Line will be passing through Missouri on the way to St. Louis and points east and the Rock Island Clean Line which will pass through Iowa and tie into several eastern states.

These projects are not so much about the here and now, but rather the there and then. Multimillion dollar projects take long lead times between inception and completion, usually several years, so they have to be planned with the future needs in mind. The recent requirement by the EPA to reduce our nations carbon emissions only hastens our need for clean renewable electrical energy to replace obsolescent coal fired power plants.

The lines have both supporters and detractors. Environmental groups usually favor the projects as a way to reduce carbon emissions and thus reduce the risk of the damaging effects of global warming. On the other side are land owners who see the power lines marching across their land as more big government intrusion into their lifestyles and even interfering with their livelihoods. Additional arguments against construction of the lines are possible health effects, and the fact that the entities proposing the construction are private companies.

It seems strange that an argument against private industry would be made. The United States to a very large degree operates that way, it’s capitalism, right? Rights of way (ROW) must be secured for these power line projects private or otherwise, just as any project in the public interest such as water lines or a railway. Fair market price must be paid for any property taken for the ROW.

Because these are direct current lines they have a relatively small footprint, at most about 200 feet wide.



The total area utilized by the Plains and Eastern Clean Line is about 8000 acres spread over the total roughly 300 miles in Arkansas. The actual land area taken out of service is much less than that as grazing land and hay fields are essentially undisturbed even within the ROW.

Health effects of the power lines relate to several phenomena – Induced magnetic fields, possible corona discharge, and ion production. There is no convincing evidence based on years of experience with power lines that any of the aforementioned causes have health effects.

The magnetic field induced by the proposed line is about the same as the earth’s magnetic field. A few meters from the edge of the right of way won’t even deflect a compass. Power transmission line operators design equipment to avoid corona discharge as it wastes power. With respect to the ions generated, if you worry about power lines, stay away from beaches and waterfalls as they produce even greater numbers of ions.

In the interest in full disclosure I am a member of the Arkansas Chapter of the Sierra Club which has endorsed the proposed power line.