Wind Power Transmission Line

A federal decision on the Plains and Eastern Clean Line High Voltage Direct Current line is imminent. This proposed 700 plus mile long transmission line will extend from the panhandle of Oklahoma, through Pope County, and on to Memphis. If approved and built it will allow for the movement of large amounts of wind generated power from the midwest to parts east where it can be used to replace coal fired generating plants.

The route already approved by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) will pass through central Pope county. A substation just north of Atkins will allow Arkansans a piece of the power from the line. For perspective the line will cross Big Piney Creek near where it crosses Highway 164.

The line and others like it are necessary to reduce our need for coal which fouls the atmosphere in multiple ways. There is a superabundance of clean, relatively inexpensive energy waiting to be tapped in the midwest, the only need being transmission.

The Line is not without its detractors however, especially those in the path of the powerline right-of-way (ROW.) It will require a couple of hundred foot wide ROW with 150 foot towers spaced about 5 to the mile. The land within the ROW can be used safely for any purpose with the exception of forestry – crops, hay fields, and pastures are acceptable uses for the area. Landowners will be compensated for the ROW but they complain that compensation is insufficient.

It really boils down to “Not In My Backyard” (NIMBY.) This is not surprising, nobody wants their view of a skyline marred by powerlines. But powerlines are a fact of modern life. Anyone who is connected to the electrical grid benefits from numerous folks having yielded a ROW to get that power to their home or business.

One suggestion to remove the negative visual impact would be to bury the line underground. It has been done locally on a very small scale. In some newer subdivisions the distribution lines are buried but not for far, as it is quite expensive compared to overhead lines.

The relative cost of burying high voltage transmission lines is assumed to be prohibitive as it is just not done with the exception of lines that cross large bodies of water where it is the only possible alternative.

To bury a transmission line requires serious disruption, trenching then back filling, not just pastures and hay fields but sidewalks, roadways, and even rivers and wet lands. For forest land, a clear cut ROW would be necessary to be able to bring in the heavy equipment necessary to excavate and lay the line.

One of the benefits of buried lines is that they are less susceptible to weather related outages. The other side of the coin is when an outage occurs in an underground line it is harder to locate and harder to access, changing repair times from hours for overhead lines to weeks for underground lines.

Cost estimates are in the range of 2 to 10 times more expensive than overhead lines. Power companies across the land, whether private like Entergy or public like the Arkansas Electric Coops, have made the decision to stay with overhead lines, wherever possible.

2 thoughts on “Wind Power Transmission Line

  1. Dave Ulery

    Imminent, is it, Bob? Are you aware of something we aren’t? And, how are you to be taken seriously if you can’t spell “Atkins”?

    Not only are you wrong about HVDC only being done underground small-scale and locally, but Germany is making it the new standard. Why? Because of opposition.

    http://blockcleanlinepope.blogspot.com/2015/10/germany-is-requiring-new-hvdc.html?m=1

    You can read about the Sued Link here:

    https://www.transnetbw.de/de/uebertragungsnetz/dialog-netzbau/sued-link

    It is a proposed 500kV, underground, 4,000mW, 500 mile, HVDC line.

    If you are going to call a significant portion of your community “NIMBY”, you should at least do your homework. It’s the eminent domain, Bob. You can call your community “NIMBY” until the proverbial cows come home, but it doesn’t change the fact that Clean Line doesn’t qualify to use eminent domain for their private gain. Sorry.

    Reply
    1. bob Post author

      The countryside is laced with electric lines, natural gas lines, oil pipelines, and railroad tracks all owned by private companies. They all secured rights of way via eminent domain. I fail to see the difference with this HVDC line and the others I just mentioned.

      Reply

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